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Preventive Health Guidelines

Make This Year Your Best Year For Wellness

Your health plan may pay for tests to find disease early and routine wellness exams to help you and your family stay well. Talk with your doctor (health care provider) about the care that is right for you.


What Is Your Plan For Better Health?

Use this guide to know when to set up visits with your doctor for you and your children. Ask your doctor which exams, tests and vaccines are right for you, when you should get them and how often.

Key Resource

Well Woman Checkups

Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about your health.

Well-Baby And Child Screenings

Well-baby and child screenings

Well-Baby Exam — Birth To 2 Years*

Infants who leave the hospital less than two days (48 hours) after birth need to be seen by a doctor within two to four days after being born. You might talk to the doctor if you are a first-time parent, are having a high-risk pregnancy, or want to learn about feeding, circumcision or well-baby care. At the well-baby exam, you may get advice on your child’s safety, dental exams and care starting at age 1 year if needed, healthy eating and development. At these exams, your baby may get vaccines and these screenings or added screenings, such as tuberculin, urine testing and/or sickle cell anemia testing, if needed.

Well-Child Exam — Ages 2½ To 10 Years

You may get advice about how to keep your child safe, how to prevent injuries, counseling to reduce the risks of getting skin cancer, good health, diet and physical activity, and development, as well as annual dental referrals starting at age 3 or earlier if needed. At these well-child exams, your child may get vaccines and these screenings or added screenings such as tuberculin and urine testing, if needed.

Well-Child Exam — Ages 11 To 18 Years

The doctor may talk to you about health and wellness issues. These include:

  • Diet and physical activity
  • Healthy weight
  • Dental health
  • Dentist referral each year
  • Mental health
  • Sexual behavior and screening for sexually transmitted infections
  • How to prevent injuries
  • Counseling to reduce your risk of getting skin cancer, special risks you might have for cancer (such as family history) and steps you can take to reduce those risks
  • Secondhand smoke
  • Avoiding tobacco, alcohol and drugs

At these exams, your child may get vaccines and these screenings or added screenings such as tuberculin and urine testing, if needed.

*This guide is for people enrolled in the Anthem plan. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about your health.

**Height and weight is used to find BMI. BMI is used to see if a person has the right weight for height or is under or over weight for height.

Suggested vaccine schedule*

For more information about vaccinations, visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines.

Your plan may not pay for all services and treatments in this guide. To learn more about what your plan pays for, see your Member Handbook or call the Member Services number on your ID card.

Go to member handbooks
Learn more about how it pays to be HIP and healthy

Page Last Updated: 07/10/2024